Living in The Cottage of Vienna , My Vienna

All Saints’ Day with A View

Oct 23, 2016

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All Saint’s Day is coming up and of course here in Europe this is the season to look after the graves of the dear ones lost. Vienna’s Cottage Quarter has a scenic cemetery overlooking the City’s vineyards, all painted in autumn colors at this time of the year. The Döblinger Friedhof reiterates the history of fin-de-siècle Vienna in all its prominent beauty and tragedy. Here you will find the graves of Gustav Klimt’s famous protagonists at the last resting place of Jewish society that had shaped Vienna’s destiny over hundreds of years. The cemetery dates back to 1781. It is the final resting place for all those famous inhabitants of the Cottage Quarter that this Blog post has a strong focus on, the people in the Cottage, their lives and their background stories: Theodor Herzl, Gustav Tschermak, Lorenz Böhler, Adolf Lieben, Ferdinand Schmutzer, Emil Zuckerkandl, Franz von Matsch, Josef Kainz,  Maria Cebotari or chief Cottage architect Borkowski for example, they all have lived and died in this place.

Just take the 40A bus  from Schottentor and get off at its final destination: The Döbling Cemetery. It´s about a 20 minute ride.

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